What to expect after bodywork

 

 
 

 After a bodywork treatment it’s common to feel fatigued, have an increase in thirst, feel digestive shifts or have an emotional response. The recommended after care is rest and hydration. If you are going to carry on with activities, limit strenuous activities, or do half of what you would normally do. If muscle soreness arises, ice pack or heat are helpful based on what was recommended to you. Most importantly, Listen to your body.

During the consultation, we may work through body mechanics, posture assessment, range of motion assessment, lifestyle choices, stress levels, nutrition, sleep patterns, current regimen and wellness goals that you may have. We will go over recommendations for post treatment self care which may include stretches, hydrotherapy, supplement/herb recommendations and lifestyle

Rest

After a session together give your body time to rest. Limit intense physical activities for at least 3 hours, preferably 12 hours. This is so your body has a chance to acclimate to the work we’ve just done and stave off holding patterns. Rest is an important aspect of healing and nurturing your body is key.

STAY HYDRATED

The recommended daily liquid intake is 64 oz. Bodywork stimulates toxin processing, which results in an increase of thirst and urination. This is a normal body flushing function so to encourage it I recommend maintaining the recommended liquid intake, specifically of water.

BATHS AND ICEPACKS

Depending on the work we do, the condition of your musculature and/or holding patterns, you may find that you have muscle soreness the day after a treatment. This is common and only lasts a day or so. Epsom salt baths, ice packs or a topical analgesic can be very helpful to ease soreness. Feel free to contact me regarding which specific remedy will work best for you if this information wasn’t given to you at our appointment.

***If our treatment included Cupping baths and ice are not recommended for 12 hours after appointment due to the possible increase of skin surface congestion.